Fall 2018

{ Fall 2018 }

Contents

STEVE GLASS

38

Twenty-five years later, an architect’s modern farmhouse vision still rings true.

By Christy Lejeune

44

How a tiny, once-weary farm has grown to produce a bountiful harvest of community, connection and understanding.

By Stephanie Powell

50

Part maker’s haven, part restaurant and bakery, part loving community hub, Ginger and Baker is a foodie’s dream made real.

By Becky Jensen

Fort Collins Magazine / Fall 2018

{ Fall 2018 }

Contents

6

7

A new Poudre playground / musician Liz Barnez comes into her own / a surprising retail revolution in Timnath / more
By Chryss Cada, Andrew Kensley, Corey Radman

16

How Laurie Klith’s vision helps empower youth to make healthy choices.
By Carrie Visintainer

18

Otterbox’s genius new adventure line awaits.
by lisa blake

20

An off-the-grid fire tower offers an amazing fall-color viewing perch.
By Julie Dugdale

22

Can your DNA help you get fit, lose weight and get healthy?
By andra coberly

33

Marble madness / cider DIY / more
by Lisa blake

59

A creamy pasta comfort / catching up with the Foodist / winery discovery / more
By Lisa Blake, Andra Coberly, Shawna Jackson

64

Poudre School District Superintendent Sandra Smyser
by corey radman

courtesy photos; andrew bradberry, Matt graves, Don markus

Fort Collins Magazine / Fall 2018

{ Fall 2018 }

Letter from the editor

When I was a little girl there was a cornfield I used to love to explore. It was flanked by a river and a forest of oak trees, and I spent a lot of summer hours building rock bridges across the river or making forts, hiding from adults and enjoying the freedom of being out from under their watchful gaze. The air smelled like mud and turtles, corn silk and Queen Anne’s lace. It was a hushed respite from the buzz of lawnmowers and the orderly houses on my nearby street.

One day, I watched the stakes go into the ground and I knew what was coming. Concrete roads. Then the scraping and sculpting of lots, the digging of foundations. At first just a handful of homes, then they overtook the field, the forest, even the riverbanks, which were smoothed over and seeded with grass. They called the new subdivision Oak River, but it didn’t feel much like its namesakes anymore. As I grew older and the houses kept coming, I steered my 10-speed to the pool or the playground instead, contenting myself with friends and books. I wonder, now, where the kids who live nearby go to fish and ramble, forge pacts and wage wars, pretend, get lost.

As anyone who grew up in a more pastoral place can tell you: Change is hard.

Faster than you can say “Choice City,” ranch land and farmettes have given way to patio homes and pilates studios. The once-yawning stretch of corn and pasture between Fort Collins and Loveland is now a connect-the-dot of subdivisions. An Old Town bungalow, once a quirky starter home option, is now maddeningly out of reach—or fodder for a big-budget pop top.

A lot of us have a nostalgia for the NoCo of old, even those of us more newly arrived. After all, it’s the charming main streets and wide open spaces that drew so many to begin with.

That nostalgia doesn’t have to turn on us. We can channel it as we build what comes next. And that’s what the stories in this issue have in common—a lot of love, and a will to bring into being something that honors our roots and invites others to share the joy. At Laughing Buck Farm, a lonely young mom turned her weary eight acres into a farm haven to share with other families. Ginger Graham envisioned a market/cafe/bakery/culinary haven from an old feed store. Architect Greg Fisher paid homage to his wife’s ranch upbringing by creating a postmodern farmhouse. And all of these inspired moves were about connecting—to our history, and to each other.

We can’t live in the past, but we can treasure what it made us become, hold it as part of who we are, and take the best bits of it with us. Here’s to many more inspired new beginnings.

Cara McDonald, Editor / Fort Collins Magazine / [email protected]

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Fall 2018
volume 7 • issue 3

Publisher
Amy McCraken

Editor
Cara McDonald

Contributing Writers
Lisa Blake, Andra Coberly, Andrew Kensley, Stephanie Powell, Corey Radman, Shawna Jackson, Carrie Visintainer

Design
Shelley Lai

Contributing Photographers
Andrew Bradberry, Steve Glass, Matt Graves, Don Markus, Stephanie Powell, John Rice, Julia Vandenoever

Advertising Sales
Amy McCraken, Kimberly Moore, Saundra Skrove, Tina Sroka

Advertising Design
Anne Marie Martinez

Ad Sales Coordination
Allison LeCain

Social Media
Lisa Blake

Printing & Pre-Press
Ovid Bell Press

For advertising or editorial inquiries
970-797-9200
[email protected]

For subscriptions call 970-797-9200 or visit fortcollinsmag.com

Fort Collins Magazine is published quarterly by Evergreen Custom Media

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Copyright© Evergreen Custom Media.

All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part with express written consent is strictly prohibited. Evergreen Custom Media does not assume responsibility for the advertisements, nor any representation made therein, nor the quality or deliverability of the products themselves. Fort Collins Magazine is printed on 20 percent recycled (10 percent post-consumer waste) paper using only soy-based inks. Our printer meets or exceeds all Federal Resource Recovery Act (RCRA) standards.

Fort Collins Magazine / Fall 2018

{ Tips, Trends, Stuff We Love }

News&Notes

development

Poudre Playground

With the closest whitewater parks currently in Boulder and Clear Creek, local kayakers have been seeking a playground along the Poudre for at least a decade, says Fort Collins deputy city manager and COO Jeff Mihelich. Good news: The time has come. As of press time, construction on a whitewater park on the Poudre was slated to begin in August.

The park, also referred to as “Reach 3”, is estimated to cost $11.5 million in both community capital improvement and private funds, and will be located adjacent to North College Avenue, between the Discovery Science Center and the BNSF railroad tracks. It will include trails, put-in and take-out points for kayakers and tubers, a children’s park and a pedestrian and bike bridge to connect the north and south sides of the river.

And while the initiative signals yet another reason to keep Fort Collins in the crosshairs of “Best Outdoor Town” list makers, Reach 3 is about much more than a new place to perfect your Eskimo rolls.

That’s because it’s merely one tentacle of the expansive Poudre River Downtown Park master plan, in the works through Fort Collins City Council since 2014 (with an estimated completion around summer of 2019). City planners are counting on the expansion to extend a helping hand to energy and economic development to the River District and Downtown Fort Collins, whose focus is on enhanced habitat, improved recreational opportunities and even better flood mitigation.

Ultimately, according to the Fort Collins city officials, the goal is to nurture the unavoidable intersection between four crucial elements of future success: conservation, preservation, development and recreation. —Andrew Kensley

{ News & Notes }

Shopping

New Market Forces

How Timnath is creating community with a new outlet for local artisans, craftspeople and foodies.

Remember Timnath, that sleepy hamlet on Fort Collins’ eastern edge? As of this past May, it’s taken a big step toward achieving its stated goal of “cultivating community through culturally responsible commerce.”

With the opening of the CF&G Public Market Collaborative opened on Main Street, the town of barely 3,000 is set to make its mark as the newest hip gathering spot for Northern Coloradans. With its farmers market, coffee shop, meeting spaces and of course, partnership with a brewery (Timnath Beerwerks) Timnath is becoming more than the town on Super Walmart’s mailing address.

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{ News & Notes }

Expert Tip

How to Shop a Farmers Market Like a Pro

Intel from Nancy Zimmerman, owner/manager, Drake Road Farmers Market

• Mix it up: “Look for unique fruits and veggies outside of the ‘Holy Trinity’ of tomatoes, peaches and corn,” says Zimmerman. Spring brings greens and berries, summer yields apricots and okra, while apples and pears appear post-Labor Day.

• Trust your senses when choosing: Especially smell. And, Zimmerman says, a few bugs on your corn is fine—it means it probably wasn’t doused in pesticides.

• Trust your senses when choosing: Especially smell. And, Zimmerman says, a few bugs on your corn is fine—it means it probably wasn’t doused in pesticides.

• Bring a cooler: Stash your wares while you browse through those full-frontal NoCo heat assaults. When you get home, wash your produce and wrap it in paper towels. “And remember to use it!” Zimmerman says.

• Don’t fret about prices: Expect fresh homemade bread to cost about $6 a loaf and pasta around $8 per pound. Remember, hand-crafted or sustainably farmed goods are labor intensive, and you’re supporting local merchants, who put money back into our economy. —A.K.

{ News & Notes }

Music

Reclaiming Her Time

Liz Barnez reflects on a a lifelong career making music in NoCo.

Liz Barnez has been performing her sig nature “swamp groove” songs—a mix of folk, blues, country, and New Orleans R&B—in the Colorado music scene since moving here from New Orleans in 1988. At fifty-something, she says a career as a musician hasn’t been easy, but it’s been satisfying. That’s due, in part, to the way she’s come to see her purpose.

She remembers being asked about her definition of success in her twenties. At the time, she answered, “I get to do what I love to do. And I can pay for my life.” Thirty years later, Barnez can tell you success is more complex than merely playing and paying rent—it’s about creating space for connection. “I feel totally successful in that I allow myself to be an artist.” Acknowledging the airy-fairyness of the term “allow,” she says that means always having a flexible day job that leaves room for music at night. It’s being present for songs when they want to be written; playing gigs “without a mask on;” being open enough to share her real story through song so the audience can connect to it.

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{ News & Notes }

Trend

CHOP TO IT

Where to catch CSU’s “timber athletes” in action—and why you should.

“IT’S A GREAT WAY to relieve the stress of being a student,” says Galen Burr, sinking the wedge of a massive ax into the soft wood of a Cottonwood.

Before raising his axe again, he surveys the tree-strewn prairie around him as it fills with golden light from the sun setting behind the nearby foothills. This is the practice field for Burr and the dozen or so other timber athletes on Colorado State University’s Logging Team.

“In the chainsaw obstacle course, you run up a log that’s six feet in the air with your chainsaw, then you cut off a log on the end and run back down,” team member Ethan Doyle says. “It’s a blast.”

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{ News & Notes }

Around Town

Bloody Mary Tour

Here’s five of the best loaded and build-your-owns in town.

BY LISA BLAKE

SHE’S A PICK-ME-UP on a rough day, a sunny patio brunch buddy and, in some cases, a full on pint-glass banquet. Here’s where to find the best of this tomato-based bevvie in all its many forms.

Blind Pig Pub
There’s something so satisfying about creating your own methodical masterpiece and then sipping and nibbling its accouterments. The $5 weekend build-your-own Bloody Mary bar at Blind Pig Pub draws thirsty co-eds with its Bloody Revolution mixes that include a smoky ribeye version and a wasabi ginger iteration. Choose from 30 hot sauces and garnishes that rise above with bleu cheese olives, pearl onions and pickled giardiniera.
214 Linden St., 970-493-9197
blindpigfortcollins.com

SHE’S A PICK-ME-UP on a rough day, a sunny patio brunch buddy and, in some cases, a full on pint-glass banquet. Here’s where to find the best of this tomato-based bevvie in all its many forms.

Blind Pig Pub
There’s something so satisfying about creating your own methodical masterpiece and then sipping and nibbling its accouterments. The $5 weekend build-your-own Bloody Mary bar at Blind Pig Pub draws thirsty co-eds with its Bloody Revolution mixes that include a smoky ribeye version and a wasabi ginger iteration. Choose from 30 hot sauces and garnishes that rise above with bleu cheese olives, pearl onions and pickled giardiniera.
214 Linden St., 970-493-9197
blindpigfortcollins.com

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{ Where The Heart Is }

Our Youth

The Center for
Family Outreach

Noting a lack of services in NoCo for teens, Laurie Klith stepped forward to empower youth to make healthy choices.

BY Carrie Visintainer

SHORTLY AFTER THE final school bells ring around town, a group of teenagers congregates inside a cozy building in Old Town. Lounging around an oblong table, they check their phones, scrolling, tapping, eyes glued to their screens. Suddenly a spunky woman in a flowing skirt breezes into the room, readers dangling from a cord around her neck. It’s Laurie Klith. She greets each person by name, joking with them, demanding in a firm- but-fun way that they turn off their phones. “You know me,” she says, grinning. “I make you actually look at and talk to each other!”

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{ Style & Shopping }

Local Product

Otterly Genius

We’re digging this FoCo icon’s next generation of life-proof gear.

BY LISA BLAKE

CURT RICHARDSON’S dryboxes have kept our keys and wallets safe from oceans and rivers since ’98. His injection-molded protective cases toilet-drop-proof our Apple, Samsung, LG and Google smart products. And now, the Fort Collins innovator’s OtterBox Venture and Trooper coolers promise to be our frosty beer’s best friend.

The new cooler line hollers back to the company’s outdoor industry roots. Richardson and wife Nancy founded OtterBox—named for the playful, waterproof-furred mammal—in their garage while brainstorming a way to carry passports on their deep-sea diving adventures.

Like the phone case line, the new made-in-America Venture coolers are created through injection molding, making them more durable with an impressive 14-day ice-retention time. Users can customize and add features such as wheels, side tables, separators, cup holders and bottle openers. Camping cooks appreciate the side table with the cutting board add-on, while beach-goers dig the wheels. Keeping up with the Yetis, OtterBox also announced its Trooper soft-sided lightweight coolers earlier this year. Their spin? Rather than the typical soft-sided cooler zipper lid, OtterBox soft coolers feature flip-top and wide-mouth lids that stay open when you’re loading or unloading.

209 S. Meldrum St., 970-825-5650
otterproducts.com

{ Adventure & Travel }

Towering Above The Rest

Tired of the leaf-peeping crowds? We’ve got an alternative.

By Julie Dugdale

Everyone loves a good fall foliage drive through Rocky Mountain National Park. But let’s be honest: If the elk are out and the tourists are congregating, you might spend more time sitting in the car wedged between bumpers than actually leaf peeping. The park’s visitation numbers have increased more than 40 percent over the past five years, and nearly half of the 10 busiest days in 2016 were in September.

That’s why we roughed out a Plan B: an outdoor escape with killer access to fall colors—sans the line of cars as far as the eye can see. Welcome to your weekend getaway at the Squaw Mountain Fire Lookout.

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{ Health & Wellness }

personalized medicine

Heredity and Health

Can your DNA help you get fit, lose weight and get healthy?

By Andra Coberly

Eat less, move more.

For ages that was the standard advice for losing weight and getting healthy. But times have changed. We now know not every diet or exercise plan works for every person.

Thanks to advances in genetics, a new industry is putting an end to one-size-fits-all fitness and nutrition regimens. Yes, spitting in a tube and shipping it to a lab may unlock the secrets of your health — from your sensitivities to gluten and lactose to the exercises that will get you the best results.

“Everybody is big on high protein diets right now,” says Kevin McCoy, who runs the DNA product line at Lose it!, a popular weight loss app. “If [DNA testing] shows you you should focus on eating a low fat diet, then maybe that high-protein diet is not for you. When it comes to the fad diet of the year, you may not respond to it.”

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{ How We Live and Grow in NoCo }

Home&Garden

Crushing It

Autumn’s hottest accessory? A DIY cider press that transforms ripe fruit into liquid gold. Who needs a cheesecloth and strainer when you’ve got a heavy-duty cast-iron and hardwood cider and wine press? ($299, williams-sonoma.com) The cool fall harvest gadget uses a centuries-old press design with an easy double-ratchet lever (read: less muscle, more mechanics). Simply load fruit into the 16-quart wooden barrel, turn the lever to press the wooden blocks onto the fruit and watch fresh juice stream out of the spout. The press also works on grapes, citrus, cherries and most stone fruit.

Prefer your juice spiked? Pick up a copy of The New York Times-bestseller The Drunken Botanist for more than 50 from-the-earth cocktail recipes. —Lisa Blake

{ Home & Garden }

5 GREAT FINDS

Marble Marvels

Unpredictable in its melty swirls, sleek and hard as nails—marble is finding its way into almost every room of the house.

BY LISA BLAKE

…Solid Comfort
Invoke Greek goddess slumber under this ancient stone–inspired cotton comforter from Urban Outfitters.
$159, urbanoutfitters.com

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{ Home Trend }

hot property

Shape Shifter

After 30 years, the storied grocery store–turned-home is for sale. What will it be next?

BY LISA BLAKE

Joe Coca is used to folks knocking on his door, asking for him to tell the story behind his two-level Magnolia Street red brick home.

The 1912 Fort Collins landmark housed Everitt Atherly’s East Side Grocery until the early 1950s, when it became The Barter Mart, then a Carpenter’s Union and the East Side School of Dance before Coca purchased it from a friend in 1988. He set up his photo studio downstairs and he and wife Lee Anne Peck put down roots in the sprawling upstairs apartment outfitted with a rooftop deck and brick patio. The basement serves as their offices, as well as housing a guest bedroom.

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By Christy Lejeune
Photography by Steve Glass and John Rice

Twenty-five years later, an architect’s modern farmhouse vision still rings true.

By Christy Lejeune
Photography by Steve Glass and John Rice

Nothing rustic and farmy here, but a mix of vibrant colors and textiles warms the living space.

ONG BEFORE THE PHRASE “MODERN farmhouse” made its way into the design vernacular, before Chip and Joanna built an empire out of mixing the contemporary with the classic, Greg Fisher had a bit of a problem. It was the early ’90s, and the Fort Collins-based architect was designing a home for his own family. He envisioned a postmodern aesthetic, inspired by the stark, avant-garde designs he’d come to love in architecture school. His wife Jeneen, however, was more of a traditionalist: She’d always pictured something a bit homier, something not too far afield from the place she’d grown up in. “My grandfather built our house—a white farmhouse on a ranch in Montana—in 1930 or so. It was a humble place, nothing very cool. But to me, that’s what stuck. A white farmhouse means home to me.”

Story and Photos by
STEPHANIE POWELL

How a tiny, once-weary farm has grown to
produce a bountiful harvest of community,
connection and understanding.

Story and Photos by
STEPHANIE POWELL

How a tiny, once-weary farm has grown to produce a bountiful harvest of community, connection and understanding.

ll she wanted was room for a horse. Nearly 20 years ago, Rosemary Jedel Graff stood gazing out over the worn-out eight-acre farm and counted the negatives: Weed-covered fields. Downed fences. Plumbing problems. The list went on. But the eight-plus-acre spread in North Fort Collins had something else: there was a hay barn. “When I walked into that hay barn, the smell of that hay…it was my childhood,” says Graff. “And despite nearly everyone telling us that we should walk away, I couldn’t.”

Graff convinced her husband, Greg, who teaches in the agricultural department at CSU, that what they were buying wasn’t just a house or a barn. They were buying a certain kind of life for their children (then just 2 and 4), one rich in animals and in connection to the natural world. Greg acquiesced, and over the years Laughing Buck Farm has become a haven for all of those things and more. The overgrown fields and decrepit structures are long gone, replaced by a garden bursting with squash and pumpkins and large pastures with grazing horses. In the background, giggling kids lead a bleating goat out of a nearby barn and an instructor teaches someone how to tack up a horse. These days the hustle and bustle of the place signifies a vibrant community.

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Part maker’s haven, part restaurant and bakery, part loving community hub, Ginger and Baker is a foodie’s dream made real.

by Becky Jensen
Photography by Julia Vandenoever

Part maker’s haven, part restaurant and bakery, part loving community hub, Ginger and Baker is a foodie’s dream made real.

by Becky Jensen
Photography by Julia Vandenoever

alk up the front steps of Ginger and Baker, the larger-than-life food hub in the Fort Collins’ River District, and you wouldn’t be the first person to pause in the doorway to take it all in.

A barista pulls a thick slab of quadruple coconut cream pie from the case, bits of flaky, golden crust falling on the plate. Laughter echoes from the large kitchen classroom in the back where students are rolling out dough. To the left, The Café hums with conversation as wait staff serve plate after plate of the ultimate comfort food—all-day breakfast.

alk up the front steps of Ginger and Baker, the larger-than-life food hub in the Fort Collins’ River District, and you wouldn’t be the first person to pause in the doorway to take it all in.

A barista pulls a thick slab of quadruple coconut cream pie from the case, bits of flaky, golden crust falling on the plate. Laughter echoes from the large kitchen classroom in the back where students are rolling out dough. To the left, The Café hums with conversation as wait staff serve plate after plate of the ultimate comfort food—all-day breakfast.

It’s like being transported back in time, standing at the threshold of your favorite kitchen on the morning of your favorite memory. There’s a buzz of friendly conversation. The anticipation of good things to come. And, good Lord, it smells divine—a mix of brewing coffee, fresh-cut flowers and bubbling pies straight from the oven.

{ News, Brews, Delicious Discoveries }

Food&Drink

dish to die for

CREAMY CLASSIC

AFTER THE CRISP AND LIGHT foods of summer, heartier fare really starts to call my name. It just so happens that pasta is my love language, and Nick’s Homestyle makes a bucatini carbonara so sumptuous it’s difficult to believe I ever ascribe to a gluten-free, dairy-free lifestyle. Because, frankly, it feels like a life without joy in the face of this dish. Salty pecorino, bacon, cream and egg yolk coat a perfectly cooked, al dente pasta. Instead of the usual parsley, Nick’s adds a bit of mint which perfectly offsets the richness of the sauce. Nick’s is open daily for lunch and dinner, and if you’re looking for authentic Italian—pizza, pasta, antipasti and more, this is your place. Bonus: We appreciate the full bar and a knowledgeable staff. 1100 S. College Ave., nicksfc.com —SHAWNA JACKSON

{ Food & Drink }

profile

The Foodist

A CSU grad spins travel and a food obsession into a burgeoning foodie empire.

By Lisa Blake

THANKS TO A CHILDHOOD spent hanging out in his mom’s small town North Dakota diner, Iver Marjerison’s culinary curiosities perked early on. Once grown, wanderlust (and snowboarding) brought him to Colorado, where he worked toward a degree in agricultural sciences at CSU. During a bee-keeping internship in Jamaica, he was fascinated by how his host family grew and prepared all of their own food. It inspired him to tackle an MBA in sustainable food systems.

Now, when Marjerison travels, he doesn’t just tap locals for dinner recommendations. He digs in and unearths the tastiest margarita and the juiciest ribeye in town by asking, “Where do I go and what do I absolutely have to try there?” The answers netted the 28-year-old CSU alum the intel he eventual wove into a book, The Foodist Bucket List: Fort Collins, Colorado: 100 Must-Try Dining, Drinks, Restaurant, and Farm Adventures.

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{ Food & Drink }

SPIRITS

Grape Expectations

Ten Bears Winery tackles a beer-soaked market.

By Andra Coberly

IN A TOWN THAT SEEMS TO HAVE an endless tap of new breweries, Ten Bears Winery gets attention for being something—anything!—other than beer.

“You would be surprised the number of people who come out and say, ‘We’ve been to brewery after brewery after brewery after brewery, and you are the only winery around here,’” says Conkling, the owner and winemaker a Ten Bears. “Being in a beer town, I would say, it’s not that tough to be a winery. Besides,” he says, “variety is what makes Colorado great.”

Still, Conkling is a quality wonk, and he is working diligently to produce good Colorado wine. And when Conkling talks about “good Colorado wine,” he means good wines made with grapes grown in Colorado, something that he says is a rarity these days.

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{ 5 Minutes With… }

SANDRA SMYSER, PH.D.

The Poudre School District superintendent sounds off on growth, change and mental health challenges facing schools.

by Corey Radman

How are our schools preparing kids for tomorrow?
I think that we talk about technology because that has been the impetus and enabler for a lot of the changes, but it really isn’t about the machine. Now it’s about kids personalizing their learning… How do we teach them to really be innovative? How do we teach them to work in groups? How do we help them to learn the content they need to learn, but also to have the skills to go with the content so they can continue to learn and produce in whatever type of job they have, because everything keeps changing?

So how do you build that person?
It’s fun! Basically, by giving them experiences that are appropriate to their age. I get to see how teachers are innovating and moving and providing experiences for kids that are highly personalized at times and other times, very rote. Both are necessary.

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Fall 2018

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